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how-to-market-front-cover

 

 

It’s out! It’s little; it’s cute; and with great effort it actually works!

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Sometimes serendipity occurs. Today was my day.  An article from National Geographic came out announcing human presence in the Americas back to 130,000 years ago! http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/04/mastodons-americas-peopling-migrations-archaeology-science/?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=Social&utm_content=link_fb20170425news-earlyamericans&utm_campaign=Content&sf73751125=1.

This is one of the few times a national publication dared to cross the border into the six figure date of humans in the Americas, though there has been evidence for quite some time. The United States and Australian archaeological powers that be hold fast to their beliefs despite what comes out. It might be noted they are alone among world archaeologists. Already US archaeologists are pooh poohing the whole idea, standing on their skepticism. They haven’t been there or examined the findings. I have, on the other hand today, been suggesting that a comparison can be made with my Amazon Author page at http://amzn.to/2kV68d3. I’ve seen the evidence and heard the skepticism. It’s past time for dialog!

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I attended the IN PRINT event at the Anchorage Museum April 8, 2017. There were nine of us authors at the event. I carried my dioramas to decorate my table and add depth to the books. It would, I hoped give me a clue whether the dioramas were a draw to the table, and whether they had value to lead to a discussion of the books. The event was a delight and the dioramas were very effective. I’ll use them as often as I can.  Here they are:

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Dioramas1

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The GOODREADS GIVEAWAY has been approved. The GIVEAWAY for Courage, 30,000 BC: The Boqueirao Refuge at Pedra Furada begins at 12 am PT March 14 and ends 11:59 pm PT on March 31.  To participate either go to GOODREADS GIVEAWAY or click the button here:

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Courage, 30,000 BC by Bonnye Matthews

Courage, 30,000 BC

by Bonnye Matthews

Giveaway ends March 31, 2017.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

Enter Giveaway

 

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Library_of_Alexandria_(sepia) Author Wikimedia License CCA-SA 4.0

 Courtesy Wikimedia, license CCA-SA 4.0.

In preparing my marketing library email list platform, I am seeing library website after website, and they are communicating to me. It makes me reflect on two lines in Robert Burns’ poem from 1786 “O wad some Power the giftie gie us To see oursels as ithers see us!” I’ll leave the title alone.

Some libraries present surprises.  They’re delightful to encounter when your work involves repetitive hunting for appropriate email addresses. The Desert Foothills Library in Arizona at http://www.desertfoothillslibrary.org/.  Look for the Get Involved tab on the yellow banner at the top of the page. Click on pale blue line that says Homebound Delivery Volunteer Information.  Read about their Book Buddy Service. What a lovely service, and they screen the volunteers.

The image of the Library at Alexandria that follows is available courtesy Wikimedia Commons and is Authored by Wikimedia and licensed by CCA-SA 4.0. The Library at Alexandria is probably the most famous library in the world. The Library was founded by Alexander the Great in 332 BC. How the Library came to its end is actually uncertain. There is the story that Caesar’s troops accidentally burned it to the ground in 48 BC, but that is unproven. It may have fallen to disuse as the Ptolemy line drew to a close. Odd that the most famous library met its end and no one knows for a certainty how or why. It is my hope that libraries across the USA will continue to flourish for another couple of thousand years and another couple after that and . . .

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1280px-Female_human_head_louseIn preparing my marketing library email list platform, I am seeing library website after website, and they are communicating to me. It makes me reflect on two lines in Robert Burns’ poem from 1786 “O wad some Power the giftie gie us To see oursels as ithers see us!” I’ll leave the title alone.

In any study I look first for the overall design. That way I know how to organize the data found there. Some library websites are a single page; others vary from a few to many pages. I found the Sublette County Libraries website organized well for patron and other use. You can find it at http://sublettecountylibrary.org/index.htm. The initial home page is not remarkable but it launches you to a well-designed site. I suggest you go through the site using the pale yellow banner at the top. Click on the tabs and examine the pages. On the Location and Contact Us tab, there is a unique Little Library. Other tabs have well organized information and images of people using the library. It may be easier to do a photoshoot during off hours, but to invite people to look at your library in the absence of people can broadcast the wrong message. If you scroll to the bottom of the kids page, there are a couple of images that may linger with you for a while/

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1280px-Female_human_head_louse_(4900866320)Gilles San Martin CC by SA 2.0

(Courtesy, Gilles San Martin CC by-SA 2.0, Pediculus humanua capitis)

 

In preparing my marketing library email list platform, I am seeing library website after website, and they are communicating to me. It makes me reflect on two lines in Robert Burns’ poem from 1786 “O wad some Power the giftie gie us To see oursels as ithers see us!” I’ll leave the title alone.

Contact pages or boxes containing contact information communicate a lot. There are two major types of presentation as I see it. This is true of websites in general, not just library websites. There are sites that try to make it as easy as possible to communicate with those who arrive at the website, and there are others who underplay communicate to the point of appearing virtually shy or disinterested when it comes to two-way communication.  The latter is clear when it comes to placing Contact Us buttons in tiny type and in locations where the website viewer would not necessarily look for it. At http://www.durangopubliclibrary.org/ the Durango Public Library in Arizona has a good model for a serious Contact Us page. Click the link, click About, scroll down to click on Contact Us. The contact type size is large enough not to challenge older people and it provides both phone for local access and email addresses for those for whom phone access is not the best choice. No question, it’s welcoming to patrons, potential patrons, and others.

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1280px-Male_human_head_louse

Courtesy Gilles San Martin, CC by SA 2.0, Pediculus humanus capitis

In preparing my marketing library email list platform, I am seeing library website after website and they are communicating to me. It makes me reflect on two lines in Robert Burns’ poem from 1786 “O wad some Power the giftie gie us To see oursels as ithers see us!” I’ll leave the title alone.

Interestingly, libraries no doubt initially had website design focused on the physical boundaries where they serve. Likely, website development funding was from the government with the expectation of covering that same geographic area. Reality is, however, that once a website goes live, it’s a global entity, not local or provincial.  If I live in Boston and plan to move to Seattle, one of the issues I’ll examine before I move is the local library options. Who would think that a library website could make a difference in one’s community choice? Yet, it can.

Let’s see how a home page can make a difference. Take a look at the home page for Richmond Public Library in Virginia. You can go from this link http://rvalibrary.org/. The page is filled with people, people engaged in use of the library. It’s inviting. The big picture changes images, showing an even wider view of the opportunities at the library. To move through the big picture quicker, click on the little circle buttons at the bottom of the big picture. The page encourages the viewer to linger on the page to get the flavor of the library. No matter who you are, the images welcome you. The viewer gets the immediate feel that the library is about the patrons, not the building or wealth of information it contains.

Some library home pages will provide a picture of the library building, especially if the building is new and unique. It may look like a page from an architectural magazine. Some will provide a history of the library. If I’m looking for a good community library, I’m not sure that would appeal to me as the welcome I expect. Others will provide activities in boxes or lists to let patrons and others know what’s available or upcoming. Although the information may be interesting to some, and knowing what the library looks like may help people find it, it is not the best choice for drawing people to the library. Other pages may show no images at all but use color and design to draw the viewer to their posted information. Color and design may be appealing, but it makes the website look like a bulletin board rather than a visually literate draw to the patron or potential patron. Neither of those views will communicate a patron-focused library. One of the primary goals of a library website should be to design a patron-focused, people-to-people welcome to draw the viewer to the home page and encourage exploration of other pages, resulting in patron draw to the library.

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freedom

 

I just heard the first 15 minutes of Freedom, 250,000 BC as it will be produced in audio book form. I had to shut my eyes to listen, since I never listened to a book read like that since too far back for me to remember. It was an amazing experience! Below you can see the new cover designed to remain in keeping with the book. This is terribly exciting!

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